A Day in the Markets of Orbomba

Note: There is current dispute on the value of service projects abroad and the view of the culture that is being helped. My time in Tanzania focused on building a school in a heavily impoverished area, when, naturally, the social status is difference across the country. This was my experience and what I took away from it, but certainly not a generalization of the nation or its people as a whole.

On June 18 of 2016, I experienced the beginning of what would change my perspective on the world forever. Traveling to Tanzania was a dramatic change from my life at home, but experiencing the hardships of poverty was another detail that brought dramatic change to my life. This day was the first of many daunting tasks that put all of us into the trying situations the people we stayed with face on a daily basis.

Upon returning from a morning walk and eating a big breakfast of Spanish eggs, toast, cereal, chai, and fruit, our group was given a task to simulate the difficulties of poverty. We broke into groups and were given 10,000 Tanzanian shillings per team, which at the time was 5 USD and happened to be what the average family in the area lived on per week. The average family also happened to be seven people in size. With the cash, we were given an index card of our family’s scenario. My groups card was the poorest family and our index card required us to buy a jelly jar for water, soap, and food for the family.

The market pens not in use

Along with our instructions, we each paired up with one of our hosts to help the language barrier, as Maa is spoken in the markets and none of us are familiar with the language. Mollel was our guide and he was very helpful. He taught us words such as punguza, subuni, nahindi, and more, meaning less, soap, and maize, respectively. In the simulation, we did the bargaining and price determining, much as the family we were representing would have to. It was pretty tough to find products that weren’t crawling with bugs (especially cornmeal) or seemed clean. When we did find some that fit the criteria, it was usually expensive and almost not worth it. With the money we were given, we managed to divide up our money in the following fashion:

  • 1 jelly jar: 3000 shillings
  • 1 package of soap: 1800 shillings
  • A few kilos of cornmeal: 2500 shillings
  • 2 avocados: 1000 shillings
  • 12 bananas: 1500 shillings

While this seems fairly good for five USD, this is not a healthy lifestyle for seven people over the span of a week. Some families are fortunate enough to have a second form of gathering food, such as their own crops and livestock but not all are that fortunate. Some others are forced to give up food to send their child to school or so on.

One team’s findings

What did we do with the stuff we bought?

The items we bought from real vendors was donated back to the camp staff and community around us to help with their nourishment and other needs. From this same market, we also bought a goat for our camp staff that would be ceremonially slaughtered in the proceeding days, as is a common gift.

So what was the takeaway?

This was the first of many lessons on this trip that taught me to be humble and understand how lucky I am. Having the food I need to have a healthy life (among many other things) is something I am more aware and grateful for having after this experience.

Additionally, I apologize for the lack of photos, but I didn’t take my camera as we weren’t in a touristy area and I wanted to respect the privacy of the people involved. Thank you for reading!