Going on an African Safari in Tarangire National Park

As a break from our volunteer work in Orbomba, our tiny group hopped on a bus and drove for hours from camp to visit Tarangire National Park. While the Serengeti or Kruger National Park receive plenty of tourists and are exceptionally well known, little known Tarangire has the densest population of elephants, which makes for an exciting adventure. It’s the 6th largest park in Tanzania and has accommodation in and out of the premises.

On our way we drove though Arusha, a city living under the shadow of Mount Kilimanjaro. We stopped at a gas station and experienced drop toilets, which is essentially a toilet where you just squat and go. It was a rather comical experience, since none of us had seen them before.

On our way

On the way to the park are lots of artists showing off their finished works. I wish I had gotten a piece because they were beautiful and brightly colored. The road was gravel but had easy access to the park, making for a nice ride and into to the savannah. When we stopped to get our tickets and everything, there were some cool history kiosks and a tower to look out over the plains. There weren’t many creatures in sight, but one could maybe see zebras in the distance!

local artwork

Actually, one thing we were told before the safari is that you will be bored of zebras. Of course, I didn’t believe this in the slightest, but there are so many that they do become an overly common sight. Their stripes are beautiful and they have a strangeness to them, but they surprisingly do get old after a while. The larger herds were rather cool and we got hung up on a few since they refused to get off of the road.

Zebras

Of course you see plenty of other critters, from antelope to impalas. They mostly kept to themselves, away from the bigger herds. I loved the impalas, they were so skittish but so cute. Aside from four legged, hoofed, prey type animals, there is the opportunity to see baboons (not my personal favorite, they scare me), ostriches (which also scare me), iguanas, monkeys, and other small creatures. The baboons looked less attractive than they do in “The Lion King,” with their bare bottoms and sharp teeth. Their fur is stiff and sticks straight out. The ostriches were much bigger that I imagined, with their pale thighs and puffy feathers. They are surprisingly fast too. The iguanas are super cool, but move a lot less than the ostriches do. I didn’t ever realize they were that big!

A lone ostrich

However, some of the most memorable experiences had to do with the smaller creatures. Where we ate lunch was loaded with monkeys that were highly skilled at stealing food. The inattentive groups lost a few items and they were rather entertaining to watch. The other animal that we saw was the hyrax, which is a little rodent looking thing that is related to the elephant. Our guide, Lekihiti told us that it was his favorite animals and when asked why, he said, “well, it’s my favorite thing to eat.”

At this point, I should also mention the “Big Five” or some of the top animals to see consisting of lions, rhinos, cape buffalo, elephants, and leopards. In less moral times, the term was used to define the five most challenging animals to hunt, but now that most of them are endangered or barely existent, it is important to leave it at best five to see, rather than to hunt or harm. Rhinos especially have faced challenges from illegal poaching and hunting in general. Ivory is usually highly desired, putting these animals at a risk. This being said, make sure the tours you choose are ethical and willing to help with preserving the reservations.

Some of the other herds you will spot are wildebeest and cape buffalo. The wildebeest mingle among the zebras and are rather cute, but the cape buffalo scared me a little bit, making it easy to see why they are part of the big five. I believe I read a book when I was younger about how dangerous they are (similar to hippos) and have supposedly have killed more game hunters than other African animals. Honestly, if you google the “world’s deadliest animals” they are likely to come up. That being said, I feared them, but they were amazing to watch from a distance.

Cape buffalo

Besides the Cape buffalo, you will also see some of the other big five. While leopards and rhinos are sparse (I actually didn’t see any at all), you might have a chance to see a lion. They are rather sneaky and hard to spot, but if you are lucky, your guide might spy the top of a mane or some leftovers of a meal, hinting that they could be nearby. We saw one male, but it was pretty tricky to get a full view. Be patient, take your time, and you may have the best luck yet.

Brief tangent: Personally, an animal that deserves to be on the big five list, but isn’t, is the giraffe. These stunning creatures are long and lanky, with a certain amount of grace and a certain amount of awkwardness. They actually fit in surprisingly well to the environment, so it was super exciting when we could spot them hiding amongst the trees.

Our first giraffe

Last but not least, the highlight of Tarangire is certainly the elephants. There are so many of them that it’s hard not to miss them while driving along. My favorite spots to see them was by the watering holes, since here you can find them bathing and then covering themselves in dust. There were lots of little calves that danced behind their mothers and followed the herds around. The bulls were huge and lumbered closer and closer to our van. At one point, he almost touched it!

Elephants!

After all this excitement, we were pretty worn out and ready to return to camp. It was a fantastic park to visit and full of creatures that were carefully managed and cared for. If you are in the area, Tarangire is not a place to miss.